Nightscript — Vol. III

nightscript-3-half-coverToday I am thrilled to reveal the contents of volume three of Nightscript. As with previous years, the quality of submissions was outstanding, making it particularly challenging to narrow down the final ToC. I would like to extend a big note of thanks to everyone who submitted tales for consideration. It was a privilege to read your work.

Here, then, are the “nightscripters” of 2017:

“The Flower Unfolds” — Simon Strantzas
“Downward” — Amar Benchikha
“What Little Boys Are Made Of” — Malcolm Devlin
“Grizzly” — M.K. Anderson
“Might Be Mordiford” — Charles Wilkinson
“Palankar” — Daniel Braum
“The Gestures Remain” — Christi Nogle
“House of Abjection” — David Peak
“The Undertow, and They That Dwell Therein” — Clint Smith
“A Place With Trees” — Rowley Amato
“The Familiar” — Cory Cone
“Liquid Air” — Inna Effress
“The Beasts Are Sleep” — Adam Golaski
“The Witch House” — Jessica Phelps
“On the Edge of Utterance” — Stephen J. Clark
“Homeward Bound Now, Paulino” — Armel Dagorn
“The Affair” — James Everington
“When Dark-Eyed Ophelia Sings” — Rebecca J. Allred
“We, the Rescued” — John Howard
“Twenty Miles and Running” — Christian Riley
“Something You Leave Behind” — David Surface
“Young Bride” — Julia Rust
“The Other Side of the Hill” — M.R. Cosby

Volume III will be released on October 1st. Until then, I hope you’ll check out the previous editions of Nightscript.

Thank you for your patronage and support!

Lost in Arcadia

in-praise-of-panI’m delighted to announce that my story “Lost in Arcadia” will soon appear in this lovely little gem of an anthology. In Praise of Pan is now available to pre-order, and is limited to 100 copies. Jordan Krall, the editor and publisher, has once again knocked it out of the park with his cover design.

You can purchase a copy of the anthology here.

Diary of an Illness

weirdbook-33This delightful little “weirdbird” has burst onto the scene, and just in time for Halloween. I’m extremely honored to have my story, “Diary of an Illness,” included within. This Ligotti-inspired tale deals with the effects that a certain new edifice has on a city populace, and was fashioned shortly after returning home from a brief afternoon drive through downtown St. Paul, where I was appalled to discover that a historic museum had been remodeled (as if overnight) into a certain cultish and well-known “church” that shall not be named.

Weirdbook #33 is available from Amazon.com.

A Lineage of Shadows, Redux

I had the honor last year of appearing on The Outer Dark, a podcast hosted by World Fantasy Award-winning author Scott Nicolay. The program has since shifted platforms, appearing now on the essential web-presence This is Horror. Scott was kind enough not only to remaster the original interview, but to record a second segment wherein we discuss Nightscript Volume 2.

Give it a listen, if you’ve the time and inclination.

 

Nightly Horror: An Interview

I had the distinct pleasure recently of being interviewed by Gwendolyn Kiste, an accomplished author of dark fiction whose work I have long admired. In the interview, I discuss my origins as a writer, some early and current influences, and of course the continuing saga that is Nightscript, my annual anthology of “strange and darksome” tales. Don’t hesitate to investigate Gwendolyn’s blog, which is an essential resource for new and established writers, featuring as it does numerous author interviews and insights into the writerly life, as well as a list of venues where you can submit your work!

Nightly Horror: An Interview with Gwendolyn Kiste

Defining ‘Quiet Horror’

Abandoned FarmhouseI was asked recently by Acep Hale, a contributor to Lovecraft eZine, to provide a definition of quiet horror. Here is what the ol’ brainpan came up with:

Quiet horror is that abandoned farm house at the end of the country road, the one you’ve returned to again and again, attracted by its grotesque beauty, its dilapidation, its mystery. It fills you with wonder, and most of the time you’re not entirely certain why. And that’s okay. The unknowns in life make things interesting, prod the imagination into fashioning the subtle horrors it so often seeks. You’ve snapped dozens of photos of the derelict structure, not only of its exterior but the interior as well, a select portion of which now reside along your apartment wall in sleek obsidian frames. The bustling metropolis outside your bay window is another kind of horror, more visceral, more in-your-face, brimming with not-always-wanted noise. But there is escape. You need only return to that spectral wall and gaze at the subtle, dreamlike images you have captured, experiencing that quiet and satisfying thrill yet again. The solitude of open space and the broken bit of mystery which lies upon it—a sensation and an image which linger long and challenge easy resolution.

Be sure to give the full article a look-see, as it contains four additional (and perhaps more illuminating) write-ups of quiet horror.

Datlow’s ‘Horror’

best-horror-2016Nightscript received a bit of praise recently from legendary editor Ellen Datlow in her long-running Best Horror of the Year series: “Nightscript I: An Anthology of Strange and Darksome Tales is a very promising anthology debut of what’s intended to be an annual, with content along the lines of New Genre and Supernatural Tales magazines. The first volume has twenty stories. There are notable ones by Patricia Lillie, Daniel Mills, David Surface, Charles Wilkinson, Clint Smith, Damien Angelica Walters, Ralph Robert Moore, and John Claude Smith.”